UCLA faculty members who have microbiome related funding (extra-or intramural)

Andrey Mazarati, MD, PhD

Professor, Department of Pediatrics, Neurology Division, UCLA
Photo of Andrey Mazarati, MD, PhD

Biographical Info

Andrey Mazarati obtained his MD degree from Odessa Medical University in Ukraine, and PhD from the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. His postdoctoral training was at the Department of Neurology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), under the mentorship of Dr. Claude Wasterlain. Since 1997, Dr. Mazarati has been holding academic positions at UCLA, beginning from Junior Faculty, and presently he is Professor at the Department of Pediatrics.
Early scientific interests included the role of bioactive peptides in epilepsy and epileptogenesis; pharmacoresistance and treatment of refractory status epilepticus.
For the past 12 years, main research interest is mechanisms of neurobehavioral comorbidities of epilepsy, with the emphasis on depression, ADHD, anxiety and autism. Dr. Mazarati has been exploring how epilepsy-triggered brain inflammation affects monoaminergic transmission and dependent comorbidities; and how inherent vulnerabilities in monoaminergic circuits translate in neurobehavioral disorders associated with epilepsy.
Most recent studies include the role of gut microbiome in epilepsy- how inherent variabilities in the gut microbiome composition affect predisposition to epilepsy; changes to microbiome composition and function occurring with the development of epilepsy; and how these changes affect the course of epilepsy.

Relevant Recent Publications

  1. Kumar U, Medel-Matus JS, Redwine HM, Shin D, Hensler JG, Sankar R, Mazarati A (2016) Effects of serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors on depressive- and impulsive-like behaviors and on monoamine transmission in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy. Epilepsia, 57:506-515
  2. Medel-Matus J-S, Shin D, Sankar R, Mazarati A. (2017) Inherent vulnerabilities in monoaminergic pathways predict the emergence of depressive impairments in an animal model of chronic epilepsy. Epilepsia, 58: e116-e121
  3. Medel-Matus J-S, Shin D, Dorfman E, Sankar R, Mazarati A. (2018). Facilitation of kindling epileptogenesis by chronic stress may be mediated by intestinal microbiome. Epilepsia Open, 3:290-294
Categories: Faculty, Member

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